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    Leonard Cohen's 'I'm Your Man' Album Turns 30: Artists Reflect on the 'Dark,' 'Cheesy' Masterpiece | Billboard

    Leonard Cohen’s ‘I’m Your Man’ Album Turns 30: Artists Reflect on the ‘Dark,’ ‘Cheesy’ Masterpiece | Billboard

    2/2/2018 By Ron Hart It was 30 years ago this Groundhog’s Day (Feb. 2, 1988) that Leonard Cohen carved out the ultimate fork in his road to creative immortality. If you were coming of age in 1988 and were wired into MTV’s 120 Minutes or an influential, cutting edge rock radio station like WLIR/WDRE in […]

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    10 moments that defined Danny Tenaglia | DJ Times

    10 moments that defined Danny Tenaglia | DJ Times

    Danny Tenaglia’s name rightly sends shivers down the spine of anyone who has been front, centre and soaked in sweat during one of his club sets, stomping to attention while jostling for a glance into the booth to watch someone for whom mixing records seems to be as natural as breathing. Whether he’s on for […]

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    Buddha-Bar, The Ultimate Experience Buddha-Bar | Featuring 'Bar D'O'

    Buddha-Bar, The Ultimate Experience Buddha-Bar | Featuring ‘Bar D’O’

    Buddha-Bar, The Ultimate Experience DJ Ravin Featuring ‘Bar D’O’, from Light, Sweet, Crude, Produced by DJ Bander Buddha-Bar  

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    Femme Magazine UCLA's feminist newsmag since '73 — Album Review: Vanessa Daou’s “Zipless” and the Decentering of Men

    Femme Magazine UCLA’s feminist newsmag since ’73 — Album Review: Vanessa Daou’s “Zipless” and the Decentering of Men

    Vanessa Daou, “Zipless” (1995, MCA Records/Krasnow Entertainment) By Randy James Feb 23, 2017 “The act of decentering men involves a stronger attachment to selfhood, found in relationship and solitude.” – Tabitha Prado-Richardson When I read Tabitha Prado-Richardson’s Coalition Zine essay on decentering men from one’s own narrative, Vanessa Daou’s seminal 1994 album “Zipless” immediately sprung […]

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    UCLA Arts & Healing

    UCLA Arts & Healing

    An incredible and intense day of learning with Dr Mimi Savage as part of the 8 week curriculum at UCLA Arts & Healing. Honored to be part of this incredible and important program. As some of you know, I’ve been long fascinated by the field of Art Therapy and the uses of the Expressive Arts […]

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    aRUDE — The Argument is Made: A New Radical Economy — Iké Udé’s Nollywood Portraits

    aRUDE — The Argument is Made: A New Radical Economy — Iké Udé’s Nollywood Portraits

    Every exchange is in some way and unprincipled negotiation. The success or failure of any negotiation is measured as set up against how much one party gets compared to how much the other party does not get. While the details are variable, the one constant is the idea of ‘economy’, the currency of negotiation, by […]

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    NEWS

    Leonard Cohen’s ‘I’m Your Man’ Album Turns 30: Artists Reflect on the ‘Dark,’ ‘Cheesy’ Masterpiece | Billboard

    2/2/2018

    By

    It was 30 years ago this Groundhog’s Day (Feb. 2, 1988) that Leonard Cohen carved out the ultimate fork in his road to creative immortality.

    If you were coming of age in 1988 and were wired into MTV’s 120 Minutes or an influential, cutting edge rock radio station like WLIR/WDRE in New York or KROQ in Los Angeles, your first taste of Leonard’s music may have very well been from the singles they played from the Bard’s then-new LP I’m Your Man. And though Cohen had been experimenting with fuller arrangements for his dark folk songs preceding the album with 1977’s Phil Spector-produced Death of a Ladies’ Man and 1984’s Various Positions, the dynamic shift in the sound of Man arguably left a generation of kids under the impression the Canadian poet was a synthpop act, for his eighth studio LP marked a significant change in the approach he began taking in his songwriting after discovering the novelty of a Casio keyboard he had found. It was something he had introduced on the Various Positions highlights “Dance With Me to the End of Love.” But on I’m Your Man, he soaked his sentiments in those primitive digital tones that stood in contrast to the starkness of such early classics as Songs of Leonard Cohen and Songs From A Room.

    (more…)

    10 moments that defined Danny Tenaglia | DJ Times

    Danny Tenaglia’s name rightly sends shivers down the spine of anyone who has been front, centre and soaked in sweat during one of his club sets, stomping to attention while jostling for a glance into the booth to watch someone for whom mixing records seems to be as natural as breathing. Whether he’s on for four hours, or 19.

    Catching the bug in legendary New York spots like Paradise Garage — where Larry Levan taught him about defying genre labels and creating parties where the world was welcome — a move to Miami in the mid-80s saw Tenaglia bestow an education in house music on the people of Florida at Cheers club before he returned to his hometown five years on, kick-starting a rise to the top that would eventually cement his place in the pantheons of electronic music, not to mention DJ Mag’s Hall of Fame.

    By no means an easy task, here are 10 moments that defined Danny Tenaglia. There could have been plenty more, and fresh contenders are always impending, for example his appearance at Berghain’s 60-hour New Year’s Eve this month. Digressions aside, let’s go.

    1. ‘Surrender Yourself’ (1992)

    By 1992 Danny Tenaglia was already well established in a New York club scene that owed much to its disco roots, along with the original sound of Chicago out (mid)west. At that time, The Daou were a dance music quintet whose lasting legacy would be the timeless vocals of Vanessa Daou. The outfit only released one album, ‘Head Music’, in 1992. The lead single was ‘Surrender Yourself’, for which Tenaglia was responsible for production on the Ballroom Remix. It hit number one in the US Hot Dance Club Play chart and stayed put for 11 weeks, his first major win.

    Read full article @ DJ Times

    Buddha-Bar, The Ultimate Experience Buddha-Bar | Featuring ‘Bar D’O’

    Buddha-Bar, The Ultimate Experience

    DJ Ravin

    Featuring ‘Bar D’O’, from Light, Sweet, Crude, Produced by DJ Bander

    Buddha-Bar

     

    Femme Magazine UCLA’s feminist newsmag since ’73 — Album Review: Vanessa Daou’s “Zipless” and the Decentering of Men

    Vanessa Daou, “Zipless” (1995, MCA Records/Krasnow Entertainment)

    By Randy James

    Feb 23, 2017

    “The act of decentering men involves a stronger attachment to selfhood, found in relationship and solitude.” – Tabitha Prado-Richardson

    When I read Tabitha Prado-Richardson’s Coalition Zine essay on decentering men from one’s own narrative, Vanessa Daou’s seminal 1994 album “Zipless” immediately sprung to mind. An LP-long interpretation of Erica Jong’s poetry, “Zipless” decenters men from Daou’s pleasure through an unabashed embrace of feminine sexuality and womanhood. Through “Zipless,” Daou bridges the concerns of second-wave feminism with those of then-burgeoning third-wave feminism.

    From the opening moments of “The Long Tunnel of Wanting You,” the listener is plunged headlong into Daou’s sexually intimate space. In referring to her sex as a long tunnel, Daou suggests the pleasure received from its engagement transcends temporality. There is no door at the end of this tunnel. Daou and her partner can explore this tunnel for however long they can last. A further celebration of female sexuality continues on “Sunday Afternoons,” in which Daou pleasures herself to the memories of trysts with her unfaithful, transient male lover. Daou “[sits] at home / at her desk alone” as an act of ritual, space and time aligning to activate a specific and imperfect pleasure. “Near the Black Forest”, blends self-pleasure, partnered pleasure, and the external gaze into a laidback, late-night groove.

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    aRUDE — The Argument is Made: A New Radical Economy — Iké Udé’s Nollywood Portraits

    Iké Udé, “The School of Nollywood, 2014-2016”, Nollywood Portraits: A Radical Beauty, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


    Every exchange is in some way and unprincipled negotiation. The success or failure of any negotiation is measured as set up against how much one party gets compared to how much the other party does not get. While the details are variable, the one constant is the idea of ‘economy’, the currency of negotiation, by which each participant is attempting to get the most, while preserving as much of their asset as possible. Some assets are tangible, material – money, property – while others are ephemeral, immeasurable – a theory or idea.

    (more…)

    aRUDE — The Art of Experience — Vincent Williams, Honey’s Kettle, and the Curious History of Fried Chicken

    Authenticity is a tricky thing. Like love, like art, it has no real definition other than *you know it when you feel it*. And while individual experience is subjective, a communal experience is something shared. When something is shared by many, it is no longer ‘an’ experience, it becomes ‘the’ experience *of*: it shifts from *me* to *us*, from *micro* to *meta*.

    Nothing exists in a vacuum, and everything has a beginning, goes back, has its roots. Although fried chicken is traditionally associated with the American south, its origins can be traced to African and Scotland. There were a variety of west African peoples who were frying chicken through the ages, with added seasonings. The Scotts have been frying chicken since the middle ages, but they did so without seasoning. These techniques were combined during the slave trade. Notably, before World War II, fried chicken was expensive to make and only enjoyed on special occasions. That fried chicken became a food synonymous with affordable, fast food, is an irony not lost on history; fried chicken is more than simply a type of food, it is a metaphor for the victory and ascendancy of the subjugated. 

    Like Blues and Jazz, fried chicken, has its roots in the forced hybridization of the colonial and slave trade experiences, making it a testimony to the endurance of ideas. Borne of pleasure or pain, all ideas are free for the taking; all ideas are created equal. With Honey‘s Kettle, Vincent Williams
    has carved out a singular niche: traditional southern food which is equal parts cooking and cuisine, commerce and art, grit and glam. Here, fried chicken is not simply served to customers, but served up as a expression of the manifold layers of history: fried chicken, sweet yams, lemonade and blueberry hotcakes, all manifested as products of the creative process. 

    But you need not have had to experience southern fare to realize this is not just ‘cooking’, but cuisine of the highest order. One bite down through the crispy, impeccably seasoned crust, into the moist tender meat….. this — layered with the minimally portioned, impeccably nuanced sweet-meets-sour sliced pickles (just HOW is this pairing so PERfectly POSSible?!) — and you know this quietly bursting-with-flavor combination has not arrived by accident, but by many years of exquisitely crafted design. Not just fried chicken, but a metaphor for the hybridity and delicate complexity of our nuanced, multi-dimensional, shared, American experience. 

    — Vanessa Daou, 9.28.17

    Read full article

    Props from NPR — Heavy Rotation: The 10 Songs Public Radio Can’t Stop Playing

    Deep, jazzy house is one of the more eclectic and evolving subsets of electronica, and Jaidene Veda continues to have the genre’s pulse. After receiving critical acclaim for her 2015 album Wanderlust, Veda has returned with Heart Of Gold, a release that sees her building on that momentum while expanding her sound and voice. This is evident in “Believe,” which channels stylistic forebears like Vanessa Daou and Santessa with breathy vocals set atop expansive, atmospheric melodies. The track, which features cameo appearances from Kafele Bandele and Master Mello, is haunting, blissful and sultry — making for a refined listening experience whether you’re dancing or just sitting back and nodding your head to the groove.

    Chris Campbell, WDET’s The Progressive Underground

    Beyond the Black Forest: In praise of Vanessa Daou | By Collin Kelley

    Link to original post here

    Paris. Summer 1995. A tiny hotel room in the 11th arrondissement near Place de la République. I have fallen madly in love with a blonde-haired boy, and we lounge on the bed as afternoon turns to evening. The tiny television is tuned to a music video channel, the sound at mood-enhancing volume. Over the indistinct cacophony of the city seeping in from the open window, I hear a familiar voice. I prop on one elbow, focus on the screen and there is a lithe woman with a pixie haircut cooing seductively over a languid, piano-driven trip-hop beat as dancers gyrate around her. It is Vanessa Daou singing “Near the Black Forest” from her iconic debut album Zipless based on the work of Erica Jong. If there was ever a more perfect song for seduction, I couldn’t think of one. We hear it again later at a disco in the Marais, grinding against each other, Vanessa’s song our aural talisman. The love affair, sadly, ends after Paris, but my love of Vanessa Daou remains. In some bit of surreal synchronicity, Vanessa is now my friend and collaborator. Love lost, love gained.

    Fast-forward to the summer of 2015. I am finishing the final book in The Venus Trilogy inspired by that trip to Paris so many years ago. Vanessa calls me and says she is wild about a piece of instrumental music used in the teaser trailer for the third book called Leaving Paris. She wants to write a song based on my trilogy and build on a sample of the trailer music. I put her in touch with brokenkites, the Atlanta-based electronic artist who has also become a frequent collaborator, and a few months later, Vanessa sends the demo called “Leaving Paris.” It is a haunting, melancholy love letter to the City of Light and perfectly encapsulates the trilogy. I cry for half an hour after hearing the song. Vanessa Daou’s hybrid of jazz, pop, trip-hop, house and spoken word has been the soundtrack to my life for the past 20 years. Now I am part of the soundtrack. A truly full-circle moment. How did this wondrous thing happen?

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    Alicia Keys Kills It With Her New Single

    Alicia-Keys-single-770x770

    Alicia Keys’ new single is FIRE! She has come a long way from the screeching hot mess of yesteryear. It’s been a long time coming!

    By Negra With Tumbao
    June 7 2016

    “In Common” is the new single by Alicia Keys. I have to admit that I’ve not really been a fan of Mrs. Beatz. Her voice irritates me on the level of cats screeching outside to nails on the chalkboard. I’m not sure which is worse. I can name three other songs that I like by her. The rest- straight dookie. Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 11.44.27 AM

    Not this single though. I’m getting straight “808 and Heartbreak”, afropunk meets tribal house, and b-girl sexy. This shit is not a game. Vocally, she is giving me Vanessa Daou. That breathy, sexy and melodic whisper works for her. It’s waaaay better than her “being on fire”. The video is aesthetically and visually stunning with various shades of black people dancing and carrying on. It’s quite sensual.

    The Urban Twist

     

     

    A History of the Laser in Dance Music | Thump feature

    How dance musicians find their identities by losing themselves.

    By Michaelangelo Matos

    In the mid-80s, instead of elaborate headpieces, DJs hid their identities in a different way—by using a variety of anonymized aliases. In Detroit, Juan Atkins pioneered the practice of adopting a slew of pseudonyms like Model 500, Infiniti, and Channel One to reflect different aspects of his musical personality, while still cloaking his true identity. Prior to going solo, he had been in the foundational duo Cybotron with Rik Davies; the latter prefers to be known as 3070, like a robot or machine. Multiple recording aliases were also commonplace in early Chicago house: Jesse Saunders, whose “On and On,” from 1984 was the first house record, also released records as Fresh, the Browns, the Force, and Le’ Noiz.

    Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 11.53.57 AM

    Those artists’ many monikers became the model for much early 90s techno. For example, From Our Minds to Yours, Plus 8 Records’ first anthology CD from 1991, features eight credited artists, but only two (Kenny Larkin and Speedy J) weren’t aliases of Plus 8 founder Richie Hawtin, working alone or with others as F.U.S.E., Chrome, and States of Mind, Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 11.52.51 AMamong others. Another 1991 collection, Instinct Dance, on the New York label Instinct Records, features four artists, including Barracuda, Brainstorm, and Voodoo Child—but they’re all the work of one producer, Moby, who also gets two tracks under that name.

    Such obfuscation distinguished electronic music performers from their counterparts in genres like hip-hop and alternative rock, where artists were treated like rock stars. Speaking in 2014, Vanessa Daou—whose “Surrender Yourself,” with the group the Daou, hit number one on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Play chart for eleven weeks in 1992—told me: “In rave culture oftentimes you didn’t know who the artist was: It was just a moniker. And that feeling of anonymity was important. You didn’t want to know who that person was. You just wanted to feel it.”

    Thump