VANESSA DAOU: slideshow photograph 1
VANESSA DAOU: slideshow photograph 2
VANESSA DAOU: slideshow photograph 3
VANESSA DAOU: slideshow photograph 4
VANESSA DAOU: slideshow photograph 5
    Vanessa Daou : Zipless (1994) — By Graham Reid

    Vanessa Daou : Zipless (1994) — By Graham Reid

    By Graham Reid Elsewhere There is sexy music and there is sex music. And there can be quite a difference between the two in execution. Prince made a lot of sex music but slightly less sexy music; Donna Summer and Jane Birkin brought orgasms to music — and so did Yoko Ono who screamed it […]

    Continue Reading

    Alicia Keys Kills It With Her New Single

    Alicia Keys Kills It With Her New Single

    Alicia Keys’ new single is FIRE! She has come a long way from the screeching hot mess of yesteryear. It’s been a long time coming! By Negra With Tumbao June 7 2016 “In Common” is the new single by Alicia Keys. I have to admit that I’ve not really been a fan of Mrs. Beatz. […]

    Continue Reading

    A History of the Laser in Dance Music | Thump feature

    A History of the Laser in Dance Music | Thump feature

    How dance musicians find their identities by losing themselves. By Michaelangelo Matos In the mid-80s, instead of elaborate headpieces, DJs hid their identities in a different way—by using a variety of anonymized aliases. In Detroit, Juan Atkins pioneered the practice of adopting a slew of pseudonyms like Model 500, Infiniti, and Channel One to reflect […]

    Continue Reading

    Eli Escobar - Phreeky | Air London review

    Eli Escobar – Phreeky | Air London review

    June 2016 Eli Escobar’s new release for Classic Music Company is out now! “Eli Escobar and Classic are the perfect fit, with his unique style and timelessly fresh sound making this the most natural progression for Eli’s next outing. We welcome the New Yorker to the label with this two-track EP, featuring vocal talents of […]

    Continue Reading

    A History of the Laser in Dance Music

    A History of the Laser in Dance Music

    From disco parties in the 70s to Daft Punk’s carnival-of-lights show at Coachella 2006, here’s how lasers became a big part of what defines a rave. Lasers were a visual analogue to the air-raid sirens festooning early house tracks like Todd Terry’s “Can You Party.” In fact, British police busting early raves were hesitant to […]

    Continue Reading


    NEWS

    Alicia Keys Kills It With Her New Single

    Alicia-Keys-single-770x770

    Alicia Keys’ new single is FIRE! She has come a long way from the screeching hot mess of yesteryear. It’s been a long time coming!

    By Negra With Tumbao
    June 7 2016

    “In Common” is the new single by Alicia Keys. I have to admit that I’ve not really been a fan of Mrs. Beatz. Her voice irritates me on the level of cats screeching outside to nails on the chalkboard. I’m not sure which is worse. I can name three other songs that I like by her. The rest- straight dookie. Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 11.44.27 AM

    Not this single though. I’m getting straight “808 and Heartbreak”, afropunk meets tribal house, and b-girl sexy. This shit is not a game. Vocally, she is giving me Vanessa Daou. That breathy, sexy and melodic whisper works for her. It’s waaaay better than her “being on fire”. The video is aesthetically and visually stunning with various shades of black people dancing and carrying on. It’s quite sensual.

    The Urban Twist

     

     

    A History of the Laser in Dance Music | Thump feature

    How dance musicians find their identities by losing themselves.

    By Michaelangelo Matos

    In the mid-80s, instead of elaborate headpieces, DJs hid their identities in a different way—by using a variety of anonymized aliases. In Detroit, Juan Atkins pioneered the practice of adopting a slew of pseudonyms like Model 500, Infiniti, and Channel One to reflect different aspects of his musical personality, while still cloaking his true identity. Prior to going solo, he had been in the foundational duo Cybotron with Rik Davies; the latter prefers to be known as 3070, like a robot or machine. Multiple recording aliases were also commonplace in early Chicago house: Jesse Saunders, whose “On and On,” from 1984 was the first house record, also released records as Fresh, the Browns, the Force, and Le’ Noiz.

    Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 11.53.57 AM

    Those artists’ many monikers became the model for much early 90s techno. For example, From Our Minds to Yours, Plus 8 Records’ first anthology CD from 1991, features eight credited artists, but only two (Kenny Larkin and Speedy J) weren’t aliases of Plus 8 founder Richie Hawtin, working alone or with others as F.U.S.E., Chrome, and States of Mind, Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 11.52.51 AMamong others. Another 1991 collection, Instinct Dance, on the New York label Instinct Records, features four artists, including Barracuda, Brainstorm, and Voodoo Child—but they’re all the work of one producer, Moby, who also gets two tracks under that name.

    Such obfuscation distinguished electronic music performers from their counterparts in genres like hip-hop and alternative rock, where artists were treated like rock stars. Speaking in 2014, Vanessa Daou—whose “Surrender Yourself,” with the group the Daou, hit number one on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Play chart for eleven weeks in 1992—told me: “In rave culture oftentimes you didn’t know who the artist was: It was just a moniker. And that feeling of anonymity was important. You didn’t want to know who that person was. You just wanted to feel it.”

    Thump

    Eli Escobar’s ‘Phreeky’ collab Tracksource #1

    Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 11.31.14 AM

    Eli Escobar – Phreeky | Air London review

    Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 11.16.55 AM

    June 2016

    Eli Escobar’s new release for Classic Music Company is out now!

    “Eli Escobar and Classic are the perfect fit, with his unique style and timelessly fresh sound making this the most natural progression for Eli’s next outing. We welcome the New Yorker to the label with this two-track EP, featuring vocal talents of the legendary Vanessa Daou and ever-amazing Nomi Ruiz.

    Title track ‘Phreeky’ is an uplifting disco-house jam, with the repetitively chopped vocals making this a record that will be stuck in your head for days after hearing it on the dancefloor. ‘Can’t Stop Dancing’ takes the more jazzy route, with high-pitched keys working in perfect harmony with deep synths, providing a warm and summer-ready sound”.

    Air London

    A History of the Laser in Dance Music

    images

    From disco parties in the 70s to Daft Punk’s carnival-of-lights show at Coachella 2006, here’s how lasers became a big part of what defines a rave.

    Lasers were a visual analogue to the air-raid sirens festooning early house tracks like Todd Terry’s “Can You Party.” In fact, British police busting early raves were hesitant to use their squad cars’ sirens because “the dayglo freaks started jumping up and down and shouting, ‘Can you feel it?’,” Matthew Collin reported in Altered State.

    Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 11.36.48 AMWhen raves went stateside, Laserium naturally got involved: On September 7, 1990, seventeen years after its Observatory debut, the venerable company would erect an installation at Stranger Than Fiction at Los Angeles’ Shrine Auditorium, which featured New Yorkers Frankie Bones and Vandal (AKA Peter and Vanessa Daou) and Londoners Baby Ford and Trevor Fung. In an era when most raves were dubbed “undergrounds,” the show was heavily advertised instead of relying on word-of-mouth, and took place in an above-board venue rather than a janky warehouse—making it one of Los Angeles’ most visible parties at the time.

    Thump

    LOVE IS WAR (Remixes) Part Two

    11665377_10153039930896733_6951612453086344222_n

    LOVE IS WAR (Remixes) Part Two : featured on iTunes UK Dance 💃

    featuring mixes by Terry Farley Severino Panzetta Dusty Digital Anthony Nicholson Matthew Joushua Hall GMGN Tom Peters

    with heart emoticon to all who made this set a sonic journey into D-E-E-P

    — with GMGN, Dusty Digital, Terry Farley, Anthony Nicholson, Matthew Joushua Hall, Thomas von Lintel, Tom Peters and Severino Panzetta

     OUT NOW on KID RECORDINGS

    Review: Vanessa Daou’s ‘Light Sweet Crude’ | South Florida Gay News

    Screen Shot 2015-01-12 at 12.32.16 PM

    Daou

    By SFGN Staff | John Bata

    Vanessa Daou, the native New Yorker’s seventh album on her independent Daou Records, “Light Sweet Crude (Act 1: Hybrid)” is meant as a first chapter for upcoming releases — and it is an eclectic breath of fresh air, which is how I would describe her wispy, understated, yet confident voice, that at times enters a poetic spoken word sensuality and feels like a dream you don’t want to soon forget.

    I gather that she might know a thing or two about having a wounded heart (which happens to the best of us) and she doesn’t reminisce about the glory days, with cheeky lyrics like, “We can’t go back. I say cheers to that” from the first track “BarD’O” in a wash of violins and piano trills. Her style would fit in well with other acts like Thievery Corporation who dare I say she heavily influenced and later vice versa. They should get in touch with each other for a collaboration.

    She climbed to fame in the early 90’s with releases under the guise, “The Daou” with her husband Peter Daou (who she has since divorced) had a few hits at the time, like “Surrender Yourself,” “Give Myself To You” and “Two To Tango.” All were remixed by legendary Dj and producer, Danny Tenaglia on the equally legendary Tribal UK Record label.

    “Danger Ahead” is the first single and the images and metaphors created when she whispers, “Highways with no lines,” is an example of her mastery of poetic symbolism flowing effortlessly over a four on the flour deep house vibe. “Danger Ahead” is up there with her greatest material.

    “Camouflage” is a highlight and feels like she is headed in a new and welcome direction. I wish more of the album had this kind of feel. She captures the excitement, playfulness and ultimately, the stupidity of how it really is our own fault for being foolish enough to get involved with someone we know we should not, on the song “love affair.” The “Broken Hearted” is lyrically separated into acts and describes the emotional process and risks of entering into a relationship that ends up not the way one would want it to, which is like 95 percent of the time for me.

    I guess I would describe this album as stylistically eclectic. It is dark at times, with lyrics like, “crimson of my lipstick,” or “scratch your skin as I take you in.” It is sexual, and experiments with some light s and m on “The Brunette” which is obviously about a character Daou created. However this is the only track on this album that sounds slightly dated. The LP does get better with each track ending very strong. You do not want to miss where it goes and where it will take you emotionally.

    One of the last tracks is “Revolution” and it really feels revolutionary with its airy flamenco guitars and drum patterns under an unnaturally aggressive violin. It’s about having a revolution within ourselves (not a psychotic break), which is exhilarating. This is heady stuff and mind music for those that have not completely lost theirs and want to get in touch with their inner selves again for an hour.

    Read original review @ South Florida Gay News

     

    Feat. Interview in TAR MAGAZINE | The Ocean Inside the Mirror, By Luca Lisci

     

    TAR Mag Feature

    Vanessa Daou

    The Ocean inside of the Mirror

    by Luca Lisci

    In one of New York city most known contemporary art fair we meet Vanessa Daou, artist, musician, singer.  Getting from one piece of art to another, we walk together talking about Mirrors, Sensuality, the Ocean and the Future ..some month later Vanessa gives TAR magazine’s readers a special exclusive gift: ‘Feather Waltz’ , her new song, an hommage to music composer Kevin MacLeod.

    Interview

    LL  While listening your sounds and lyrics we are surrounded by a charming, sensual energy.

    How does your art relates to sexuality? How do you define ‘feminine’ ?

    VANESSA DAOU  Sensuality & sexuality are intricately connected for me. In many ways, it’s like a game tug of war, when the rope is being pulled one way or the other. t’s the same rope, but the two sides are distinctly different. And like the game, if one side pulls hard enough, the balance will tip, and the game ends, as does the fun. The idea is to find that balance.

     My art revolves around these themes, and within the walls of that thematic space, I find infinite interest as all aspects of (my) experience & existence come into play.

    I associate sensuality with grace, and sexuality with power. These are, again, two distinct attributes that reside in oneself, and, consciously or not, we’re always choosing or taking sides. Culturally, we’re living in a time where power is winning the game, and, given the choice, most would probably choose power over grace.

    The ‘feminine’ to me is a quality. I’ve always associated the ‘feminine’ first-and-foremost with grace, or more accurately, the feminine will always be associated  with grace: a woman will always be measured up and against it. She either has grace, or she lacks it. She is either ‘feminine’ or ‘masculine’. As with many (dare I say, most?) ideas and concepts, there’s no English word for being a little bit of both. For the most part, society isn’t satisfied with ‘in-between’.

     Read full feature @ TAR Magazine

     

    ReverbNation : Rank #2 Electronica, NY

    Reverbnation #2 Electronica NY

    ReverbNation

    TROUBLE COMES — Video primier on Nerdy Frames

    Screen Shot 2014-05-28 at 4.24.36 PM

    “BY GOD, that video…..her vocals….my ears orgasm to it. See, this is why Vanessa Daou will always be a classic.“
    – NERDYS TAKE

     

    NerdyFrames